Never Trust A Strap...

USA Custom Shop Acoustic and Electric Guitars

Moderators: Kevio, ElfDude, JesseM, RockCrue, soundchick, ChrisH, peb, Mike Jones, Bundy

User avatar
3040craig
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 18
Joined: Oct 2017
Links/Contact:

Never Trust A Strap...

Postby 3040craig » Fri Dec 29, 2017 8:25 pm

I took my hands off of my DC727 for a second to pick something up and this happened:

53629826061__FF57FC84-FF51-49BE-A01C-6BE022FEE68B.JPG
53629826806__26872B8A-C29A-4EA5-AE97-64054775F361.JPG


The strap popped off and my guitar landed on the concrete floor. It's safe to say I'm pretty bummed. Thankfully, there wasn't any serious damage. Any suggestions of how to touch up the areas where the clear coat chipped? Or should I leave it the way it is?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Vader V7 Buckeye Burl / Antique Ash
DC727 Walnut

User avatar
spudmunkey
Elite Carvinite
Elite Carvinite
Posts: 15569
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby spudmunkey » Fri Dec 29, 2017 9:25 pm

Ouch!!!

Well, the good thing is that a clear finish is pretty easy to fix with some liquid super glue, a razor blade and some polishing compound and micromesh pads. I can provide more info if you'd like to know more. If you don't already have the Polish and pads it might actually be cheaper (or not much more expensive) to have someone local try.

User avatar
amon
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1079
Joined: Oct 2012

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby amon » Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:28 am

Not the strap's fault, it's the strap buttons. Never use standard strap buttons. There are numerous Strap Lock devices out there for sale. I do this to all my guitars:

Image

User avatar
dbone
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1390
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby dbone » Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:46 am

Doh man so sorry!
dbones Lefties
DC150 M22T/M22V, DC150 M22SD/M22N
DC400A, K12B/K12N, DC600 M22SD/M22V, DC800 A80B/A80N
AE185 C22T/C22N/Piezo, AE185-12 H22T/H22N/Piezo
CT7M KL14B/KL14N, Bolt C22T/AP11/AP11, AC375, CL450, AC275K, SB5000 J99A pups

User avatar
spudmunkey
Elite Carvinite
Elite Carvinite
Posts: 15569
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby spudmunkey » Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:48 am

amon wrote:Not the strap's fault, it's the strap buttons.


Not always. In this case perhaps, but there are also crappy and also over-worn straps. I had one fail on me, and no strap lock would have saved it. I was only saved by my cat-like reflexes.

User avatar
amon
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1079
Joined: Oct 2012

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby amon » Sat Dec 30, 2017 9:11 am

Eh, true enough. I've got one very old Ernie Ball strap with the infamous wallowed-out ends. My washer technique keeps it from being tossed in the trash.

User avatar
3040craig
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 18
Joined: Oct 2017
Links/Contact:

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby 3040craig » Sat Dec 30, 2017 9:39 am

spudmunkey wrote:Ouch!!!

Well, the good thing is that a clear finish is pretty easy to fix with some liquid super glue, a razor blade and some polishing compound and micromesh pads. I can provide more info if you'd like to know more. If you don't already have the Polish and pads it might actually be cheaper (or not much more expensive) to have someone local try.


That's good news. What is the process exactly?
Vader V7 Buckeye Burl / Antique Ash
DC727 Walnut

User avatar
3040craig
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 18
Joined: Oct 2017
Links/Contact:

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby 3040craig » Sat Dec 30, 2017 9:49 am

amon wrote:Not the strap's fault, it's the strap buttons.


Yeah I'm gonna look into getting some strap-locks or one of those D'Addario locking straps. I thought I was okay without them, since I never had problems with the strap coming off. Of course it had to happen when I was down in my basement, on the concrete floor. I guess I had to learn the hard way
Vader V7 Buckeye Burl / Antique Ash
DC727 Walnut

User avatar
spudmunkey
Elite Carvinite
Elite Carvinite
Posts: 15569
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby spudmunkey » Sat Dec 30, 2017 10:15 am

3040craig wrote:
spudmunkey wrote:Ouch!!!

Well, the good thing is that a clear finish is pretty easy to fix with some liquid super glue, a razor blade and some polishing compound and micromesh pads. I can provide more info if you'd like to know more. If you don't already have the Polish and pads it might actually be cheaper (or not much more expensive) to have someone local try.


That's good news. What is the process exactly?


I'll prelude this with the following: I've only done it on repairs as large as a US nickle, and on a flat surface. The methods should be the same, but may be trickier on a curved surface... But only that it'll be harder to scrape so you'll need to hand sand more.

First, chip away the finish that has blistered. Then use liquid (not gel) superglue to very slowly, putting down very little glue at a time, apply thin coats, letting layers dry fully before applying the next coat. Continue adding layers. You can either stop here with the glue very slightly below reaching the thickness of the guitar finish and say "good enough" and call it a day, knowing that while it doesn't look perfect it'll prevent the finish from chipping more...or keep adding layers of glue until you're juust proud of the guitar's clear-coat. Allow it to fully fully fully dry.

So now you've replaced the finish and built up layers of glue to just above the surface finish off the guitar, and it's time to bring it down and smooth it. Take a brand new and very sharp razor blade. You're going to use it to scrape off some of the excess glue similar my turning this razor blade into something like a woodworker's hand plane (or more accurately as bench scraper). Wrap the blade with one loop of thin cellophane (scotch or packing) tape on each end of the blade, leaving an exposed area of the blade in the middle that is just slightly wider than the glue area. This will allow you to scrape down to almost the surface finish of the guitar without scratching the surrounding areas in the actual finish. Scrape the razor blade from one end of the repair to the other, straight up and down 90° perpendicular to the guitar. Take many light passes; don't try to scrape it off all at once. When the razor just slides past the scraped-down glue area and no longer takes off material, now you can sand and polish.

I used a combination of polishing compound from StewMac and a set of 1" micro mesh sanding pads that went from I think 1500 to 12000 "grit". Soak the pads in water for a bit white until they are saturated, and start sanding, letting the pads do the work. Start at the lower grit and move your way up. I think I stopped noticing much benefit after about 5000. This is when I switched over to polishing compound. I using a dry lint-free cloth, I rubbed in the polishing compound until my arm and hand wouldn't let me any longer. I actually used 3 different course-ness-es of polishing compound. Wipe clean with a damp cloth and dry.

Violá.

This is how I repaired a chip in a headstock and even though it was my first time I still have to struggle and hold it up to the light to find where the repair was done. I've since used this method to repair two other items with similar results.

Here are the micro mesh pads I used. I might actually recommend using slightly larger pads, just because they are easier to hold, and I think might make it easier to get a smoother finish over a larger area. Just make sure that whatever set of pads you get covers at least the same grit range, not that it either starts too high so that it takes you forever to get down when you start, or ends too early and doesn't give you a smooth enough finish.: Micro-Mesh 1" Disk Assortment Pack https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003ELIO0K/re ... rAbM3TYVST

This is the polishing compound I got from StewMac. When I bought mine, they offered a 3-pack. But since they have released their new swirl remover, you can only get the complete for pack. But honestly you could just get their medium one and be fine, I think. http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and_Su ... ounds.html

User avatar
Doctor Doug
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1387
Joined: Oct 2013

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby Doctor Doug » Sat Dec 30, 2017 10:26 am

spudmunkey wrote:
amon wrote:Not the strap's fault, it's the strap buttons.


Not always. In this case perhaps, but there are also crappy and also over-worn straps. I had one fail on me, and no strap lock would have saved it. I was only saved by my cat-like reflexes.


Lasy halloween my bass player threw his bass right off the stage because his strap snapped during a bass-throw. I t was hilarious!

User avatar
spudmunkey
Elite Carvinite
Elite Carvinite
Posts: 15569
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby spudmunkey » Sat Dec 30, 2017 10:44 am

For me, it was a lesson to never buy a $4 strap from ebay again. :lol: :oops: :roll:

Rialas
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 105
Joined: Apr 2017

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby Rialas » Sat Dec 30, 2017 11:12 am

One of those days.
My Holdsworth got its first ding today (very small), after 6 months.
The first always hurts a fair bit more.

User avatar
amon
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1079
Joined: Oct 2012

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby amon » Sat Dec 30, 2017 11:30 am

spudmunkey wrote:For me, it was a lesson to never buy a $4 strap from ebay again. :lol: :oops: :roll:

The strap I use almost exclusively is the Levy's 2" Polypropylene M8 model with double thickness Polyester ends, currently $6.57 direct from Levy's.

http://www.levysleathers.com/shop/basic ... 8poly-blk/


They've also got a couple of similar models with leather ends, which makes them more expensive, but the leather isn't double thickness like the Polyester on the cheaper model, so the more expensive ones are actually less durable.

gibvel
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 219
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby gibvel » Sat Dec 30, 2017 2:46 pm

I beta tested a strap for D'Addario this fall. Very nice!! It has little plastic locks on the ends. Very hefty material and they work pretty well. They work with normal strap buttons. I tried them on my strap lock guitar as well but the buttons on those are larger so the little lever that locks is actually pushed up more than it should be.

They slip on very easily. Coming back off is a bit more difficult than taking off a regular strap but then isn't that the idea? :D If you're used to it then it's only a second or so more.

The guy I dealt with said they should be coming out this spring under the name Auto-Lock. I will probably purchase for all my guitars except the strap lock one.

Hopefully I won't get in trouble for including this photo. :D
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
amon
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1079
Joined: Oct 2012

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby amon » Sat Dec 30, 2017 3:52 pm

Looks like a variation of the ACE Lock strap (Patent #4271999, or so it says). The hard plastic ends feel awkward to me, and cut into the guitar's finish over time (something I don't really care about, but some people do).

gibvel
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 219
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby gibvel » Sun Dec 31, 2017 3:31 am

Nope, totally different locking mechanism.

This one has a rubber insert in the plastic so it's not hard plastic against the guitar

User avatar
Doctor Doug
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1387
Joined: Oct 2013

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby Doctor Doug » Sun Dec 31, 2017 11:35 am

Strap locks are life. I've never dropped a guitar and I'm pretty hard on them.

Image

User avatar
texastoast
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1842
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Duh, Im in Texas

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby texastoast » Sun Dec 31, 2017 12:40 pm

Doctor Doug wrote:Strap locks are life. I've never dropped a guitar and I'm pretty hard on them.


I just had a friend screw his up pretty bad. You need to lube the straploks from time to time or they can fail. He did not do the required maintenance and paid the price. I let one get dry and the balls got flat spotted. It popped out but I caught it before it fell many years ago. It will never happen again because I maintain and inspect them now.

User avatar
Casual Madman
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 2204
Joined: Nov 2013
Location: Garland TX

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby Casual Madman » Sun Dec 31, 2017 8:05 pm

I have the Dunlop Straplok system (same as Kiesel uses) on an Epiphone LP - also had same on my old Carvin DC150. Never a problem with them.

Been using a Lock-It strap on my Gibson LP - no hint of failure ever, but they're a bit of a struggle to put on and too inflexible to leave on in the case.

Got a couple of these DiMarzio ClipLock straps for Christmas, they seem like a solid solution. Installed on the new-to-me Destroyer even before new strings.

User avatar
tbonesullivan
Gold Carvinite
Gold Carvinite
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Jersey

Re: Never Trust A Strap...

Postby tbonesullivan » Sun Dec 31, 2017 9:17 pm

Dunlop dual design straplocks were the standard on Hamer guitars for years. You can put a regular strap on it, or a locking strap. As long as you keep them lubricated once a year, they don't fall off.

Ernie ball also makes a strap lock solution, as does Schaller. I'm more partial to the ernieball, but the schaller is lower profile in some ways.

Whether it's a strap with locking ends, a rubber washer, whatever, everyone owes it to their guitars/basses to have something solid holding it up.
Guitars: Bolt in Electric Blue, Cobalt 750T
Basses: B4A in classic sunburst , B5 in sunsetburst, XB75 in TPB, PB4 in Blue Burst, LB70F in Pearl blue


Return to Kiesel Guitars / Carvin Guitars

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests