1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

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Doctor Turn
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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Sat Dec 10, 2016 10:31 am

BTW I just took some time to listen to the various examples of the icon.. Holy crap. I just listened to that middle link with that guy demoing that red triple p90 guitar with all of that awful clanking and cronk, and that screechy high end loaded distortion. It sounds awful.

Which is shocking because lollar make such beautiful P90s. They say they made this set specifically for that 3x p90 Godin. Dunno if it's the pickups or the guys setting on his amp, or both... But I'm sure you can tell that that hair raising sound he's got is nothing like the classic P90 sounds we've been salivating for here. It's way too hot, way too trebly, it's just ugly. I can't believe Godin let that video out.

I think the Summit demo here--

https://youtu.be/6mIEMZykhdE

Is light years better!! Although it demonstrates again that Duncan winds their 90s just a bit hot and it loses a hair of that papery throaty sound of something being held back... The special aspect of this pickup type that I can never adequately explain. Even their vintage 90s are wound at 10k resistance. BUT compared to that lollar icon demo this Summit sounds positively godly by comparison!

A good P90 has a unique way of compressing when put through a good amp, and it's one of the things that makes the sound so interesting. It also can sound like a wah is slightly cocked behind the note, so when all these things are blended and released behind some good preamp distortion, it's just amazing. But if the sound is too big and round and fully "out there" that quality that we fetishize isn't going to be anywhere in evidence.
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Sat Dec 10, 2016 12:46 pm

Apologies it wasn't the middle link, it was this first onehttps://youtu.be/hDx9df8aHlY

Hoofah... That's the one with the very noisy sound I was talking about.
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Sat Dec 10, 2016 3:31 pm

Yup, that's the reason I prefer to hear these demos completely clean and why my Super Swede never even saw the distorted channel on my amp while I was evaluating it before it sadly had to go on to some other poor sucker over the tuning issues. You never know what pedal they are using into what amp and then there are the ones that have added compression, delay, etc. Kinda hard to hear the guitar much less evaluate the pups. Then he starts doing squealies. How is that helpful?

I am pretty sure I've got 2 Godins I am interested in and BTW I already checked with Stetson and they already know their TOM tremolos work on Godin guitars so there is my tremolo solution if I have to have one.

And, I finally got the SD Alnico 4 Saturday Night Specials rewired properly in my CS6 and . . . I think I know why Alnico 4 never caught on? Looks like they are coming back out . . . but a guy over on the SD forum wants a set so I may have a home for them. Should have gone Pearly Gates like I was going to do before I got my wild hair . . . :wall:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PRjUvOFO3o4

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Sat Dec 10, 2016 4:31 pm

I've been thinking a lot about the comments I've been writing on this thread and others about the sound of a good humbucker over the past few months, even a year, and I realize they trace back to two videos I've watched multiple times, both from my two favorite guitar player-reviewers on the web. The first is this review of what may be the finest burst I've ever heard... Listen to Ali Neander play this thinghttps://youtu.be/DVxPjwdssyA

Between his fingers and the sound of that guitar I just want to throw my equipment out the window.. just kidding. My 150 sounds allot like that and I'm going to upload a demo of its simple humbucker sounds alone through an amp soon. Demo it properly like a Les Paul should.

But his explanation of the tone that thing is getting is very good. He finds the right words. He mentions the Tele quality, which is also mentioned by the great Greg Koch on a1960 burst here:

https://youtu.be/p4nzKGp3ejo

That clarity on the high end pumped:

https://youtu.be/KOXfbBjQ05E

Such a special sound, apparently lost to Gibsons mass market product.
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Sun Dec 11, 2016 12:19 am

Yup, good stuff. And, Greg, well is just nuts . . . but in a good way! Wish we could have heard that '59 clean! Now, don't get me wrong. I still love to rock and do every chance I get. It's just evaluation I prefer to hear clean.

Ah, if I ever . . . see, "the plan" was to make a little coin [done], retire a little early [done but for the wrong reason], and perhaps get a "purely just for fun" band together [ain't happenin' short of some miracle cure], finally do some personal recording just for posterity if nothing else? But, whether folks want to call it "God's Plan" or just all a spiraling downfall from a farking tick bite which is why most people claim "God's Plan" [sounds SO much more important!!!], anyway, the recording and all the rest haven't happened and probably won't. Right now, it would literally be ad hoc into my HD Canon 5D III which, other than 5000GB file sizes, works OK with remote mic's or just recording into my stupid phone which, though simple enough, sounds like . . . well, recording into my stupid phone [e.g. butt!].

My 50th R9 is a quite fine instrument. Maybe I'll record something with it sometime [see first paragraph! . . . :wall:]. But, [splitting hairs] though the neck BB1 is really close to that grail '57 Classic tone I love the most, it's the BB2 bridge that is not quite as warm as the 57 or 57 Classic+ which just has a tad more bite and volume than the Classic. That said, my CS6 just plays SO MUCH BETTER, feels better, looks better, cost less, don't have to worry about it getting dropped or stolen since Carvin could literally make me another one and with a thicker neck this time :think: . . . this could go on all night . . . so it is always my goto guitar and I've got to get it right again before death do us part. If I didn't have to drill on her to get those 57s in, I'd just do it already . . . and maybe I should get out my drill? Wouldn't take much. But, those Pearly Gates pups are practically 57 Classics with an SD logo and require no drilling [I think] so close enough. Some say the Seth Lovers are but not to my ear. Thought I would try "something completely different" with the Saturday Night Specials cuz, my god, I've played 2,3,5, and Ceramic, why not 4 before rigor mortise sets in [??] . . . but, as I eluded to a few pages ago . . . I got "the fish slapping contest" instead.
:oops: :laughhard:

Do it twice Garth

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Sun Dec 11, 2016 5:28 am

Lerlz... Y'er quite the character.

Pearly Gates are interesting pups.. I've never owned a set myself, but I've heard them in multiple guitars on and offline, played them in the hand and jammed with those who had them, and they are much like--apparently, based off 4 out of 5 housewives who choose Jif peanut butter--M22SDs... Not that they sound anything alike (even though they sort of do, both PAF types), but because they seem to sound so much different in so many different guitars. Some people say that they're too thin and have too much high end... But if I were to guess, that's because, like Carvin guitars, there are so many know it all geniuses out there who concoct their "ideal guitar" (like many do in the builder here) out of elements that just don't mix well. I'd imagine if you put a set of Gates into a middling telecaster copy that you're trying to turn into a Deluxe from back in the day... Your results are going to be... Derp.

In a nice beefy Lester style axe like your glorious CS 6 I think they'll sound just fine. Awesome, not Just Fine. Should sound AMAZING!

And btw did you stick around and listen to Ali talk and run through all the settings of that 1959? The sound is clean, just a tiny hair of break up, but you definitely hear it clean... Or maybe you were talking about the last link with Koch with that 1959?

Sounds like you've given up on getting a proper Super Swede P90, eh? Too bad, that scale length mixed with that big heavy fat mahogany axe topped with that huge chunk of maple with those uniquely sublime pickups... And that N E C K... it's right up there with the very best gold tops I've played in my life. Really good stuff, and with the added tones and nuance from the rewire/custom job. It's gloriously smutty and a lifetime keeper.

Could you expound on the differences between your Carvin and your Gibson reissue? Not anything pickup related, but those things like neck, scale length, (skip the Floyd) build quality, feel, sustain, natural sound quality differences, etc. I know that the cs6 to come is not going to sound like a Les Paul, and it's not going to sound like my 150. Which is why I'm not going to build it out of koa... I don't want to invite comparisons between the two, I'd rather it be an animal into itself. Kiesel doesn't build 24.75 axes anymore, nor topless Les Paul Special style double cut stubbies, etc etc. So I'd rather not set myself up for excess comparison and just enjoy it for what it is.. a beautiful Korina beast into itself.

But what are the biggest differences to you ears and hands?
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Sun Dec 11, 2016 11:50 pm

Ha . .. "You're quite the character" is what I often get from other folks but, with them, it's "are you high?" Nope, all naturel at this point thank you very much though being high throughout the entire latter 1/2 of the seventies and taking every drug known to mankind during that period may have had some residual impact . . . don't tell anyone! :shh:

Before I get into the guitars . . . these SD SNP A4s are not "butt". I was a bit harsh, but so are the pups, just a little. Perhaps in a different guitar and even with a different attack than I use they might be perfect?? In my CS6, the bridge sounds a lot like my BB2 does clean in my LP which to my ear means it is a tad too cool and bright for my tastes. I tend to prefer a little darker warmer sound even on the bridge [think Gilmour or Andy Timmons' non-80s hairband crap - get his Sgt Peppers Instrumental if you haven't? Absolutely amazing!!!!!]. The neck sounds fairly decent clean but falls on its face badly with even just the mild bluesy distortion I tend to use most of the time now. Distorted, both pups are ALL midrange and the lows are really flabby to the point of obnoxiousness "in my CS6". I realized tonight playing just split that they do split quite nicely for a humbucker though. Much better than my S22s do though I think those S22 metal covers are part of that problem. I am tempted to slap my extra set of M22s [SD and N] in there to prove that since the specs are otherwise identical but [without the metal covers] I suspect they will also be a tad hot so not sure I want to go to the trouble?

OK, not sure what detail you're looking for on the guitar comparison but here goes . . . :stir:

Bodies: They weigh almost exactly the same. The CS6 has that wonderful bod-bevel against you though that makes it SO much more comfy and is slightly thinner period. Then there is the slight contour to the top that again feels so nice against your arm. One thing I have learned over the years is that I used to be in the camp that you had to have a brick [heavy-solid] body to get the tone I want but that was because I was mainly playing heavy non-weight relieved or non-chambered LP Traditionals that . . . all had 57 Classics in them and weight relieved and chambered LP Standards . . . all had BBs. :idea: My R9 is NOT a brick LP, yet is not weight relieved or chambered, but it has BBs, not Classics, which is why I've been tempted to change them out too. Just cannot bring myself to touch a $5K guitar. I don't have the S22s in at the moment to do an A-B on those. Since I know you like them . . . feel free to talk me in to putting in the M22s now for a better comparison. . . :think:

Neck: [As I think you already know ad nauseam] That late 50s LP neck size and shape is what I prefer but you just cannot beat that tung oiled feel the CS6 has. Though [purely from memory] I think the nut to 22nd board widths are nearly identical, the LP neck feels wider in the hand just because of the extra girth . . . also a good thing for my long skinny hands. But, if I play the LP for more than 15-20 minutes, I'll start sticking to it and I'm not really a heavy sweat-er. Again, just that wonderful tung-oil. The binding is a nice touch on the LP but not enough to miss it, I notice it's rosewood fretboard more not in a bad way but likely just because I prefer the medium jumbo stainless frets on the CS6. I honestly don't remember what they call these Reissue R9 frets or their exact dims but they are about the same width but not quite as tall and I don't even notice the 1/4" scale difference at all. My older CS6 has the exact same 12" radius so a lot of familiarity there and I have no idea how the new 14" feels other than to say I actually prefer the 16 on my Godin to the 12 so 14 would likely be better too [for me?]? The Godin is tung oiled too, and a tad thicker than my CS6 and is a 25 1/2 which I do notice . . . another vote for "going Godin" though I guess not all of their guitars are 25 1/2. Minus the tung oil, that Hag neck was quite nice though . . .

Tuners: Every guitar should have locking tuners . . . nuff said! Had a guy tell me once that is pure BS and he never has trouble keeping his LP in tune not even realizing that he reaches for his tuners in between every single song! Every song . . . played a just for fun 5-6 song gig with him once and, even with my Floyd, I won't say never but quite rarely do I touch a tuner once the strings are broken in.

Playing: It's funny that I tend to go kind of Led Zeppelin and ZZ Top on my LP [strange how that happens] - playing my normal music on my CS6, Strat, and Godin. My TL60 has been feeling lonely lately just because its nearly 14 lbs just makes the pain worse. Even the stuff I've written has a warmer darker bend so that hog-KOA just works better. You think it's just the LP's Maple top until I pick up my Godin . . . real similar body and neck shape and feel to my CS6 but with a maple top with a pretty toasty SD Custom III in the bridge though [a nearly identical to the S22J] Jazz II in the neck. I have NO explanation for that?

Um, 6 paragraphs later . . . tone actually is subjective? Imagine that . . . :applause:

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Tue Dec 13, 2016 1:50 pm

Good News Bad News on the Hagstrom front

Bad News: They are shutting Euro-operations down completely so cannot even special order a Northern [or anything else from Europe].

Good News: It turns out I have an authorized dealer in Shawnee Mission just up the turnpike so I can order a brand new, never touched Chinese SS P90 model so I am going to. Dealer said they have had some issues with the Tremar system but it's been generally setup, weak spring, etc. and they are willing to guarantee I get a good one or it goes back.

So, I will give Hag another try . . . lovin' those precious pups! :woot: :applause:

Probably take a couple weeks to get it though . . . :(

Was my previous rant what you were looking for or needing something more specific? Less specific?

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:31 pm

No all is well.. I had a whole reply typed out yesterday, but then I got booted off and even using the back arrow didn't recover the text as it usually does. The past 2 days have been insanely busy at work.. no time to breathe...

That's a bummer about the Hagstrom--does that mean no more Northen Series only, but the Asian models are still going to continue to be made? That changes things if true.. as I REALLY REALLY want a Northen Series Super Swede.. every time I hear one the sound intrigues me and I know the build will be meticulously perfect, and the price, even at 1700, is worth it for what you're getting. Like having a Les Paul standard with the perfect neck, built by Manson and with Lundgren made PAF repros made special for it. This is seriously clouding my judgement on the build to come..... :think: It's one machine that I would not want to buy used if I can get it new. Scale is right, the look is right the neck is right, and if I don't like the Lundy's then I can chuck in some Manlius Legends.

Krap man.. I'm going to ground and rethinking this now. But confirm that's what you meant?

On the CS, let me put it this way-- do you notice the difference in scale length? In sound, in feel? I play 25" plenty in stores, and it's sometimes noticeable and sometimes not, depending on the axe.

Good news on the SS P90.. :applause:

Hoofah... sad to see em go..

Image
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Ouch.. it almost hurts..
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Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Tue Dec 13, 2016 8:20 pm

They told me specifically "no more guitars coming out of Europe period". He supposedly got that "from KMC" the distributor.

Since I was willing to buy a Northern too . . . I would think they would not be telling me that if there was a chance is was not true.

On scale length, by the time you get to 25 1/2, I notice. I can go back between my LP and CS6 all day long and never even notice the 24 3/4 to 25. And I am trying to think of a single time in a store that I ever did? Since there are players that say they can play one but not the other or others, perhaps this is just a peculiarity with me not noticing that 1/4"? I notice the size and shape of the neck . . .

He was firming up pricing and colors available but didn't hear back by closing time so my tri-P90 SS is still not officially ordered yet. So, naturally, I am again thinking about that Lifeson 355 replacement and since I loved that 25 1/2 SS neck, I am thinking perhaps da-da-da-dot-duh-da . . . Super Viking hardtail and maybe put on a Stetsbar if I have to add tremolo?

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Tue Dec 13, 2016 9:44 pm

Oh I totally can notice it. I used to go back and forth between my old strat and my 150 (24.75) all the time, and now between the SS and the 150 as well as the vintage HIIN OT, which is also Les Paul scale (it was kind of like their SG to their Swede, same pickups, just a flattop double cut stubby vs the carved top Swede.)

I was just curious if you thought it had a different sound versus your LP... Most people say they don't sound like each other. I'm curious your take....
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Wed Dec 14, 2016 6:48 pm

Well, my LP and CS6 don't sound the same . . . I just cannot tell the difference between 24.75 and 25 by feel.

Not sounding the same gets into woods, construction, pups, and electronics differences though . . .

My LP is brighter and cooler where my CS6 is darker and warmer. Though I prefer the darker warmer sound, brighter and cooler is not meant to be a critique of my LP. It's a great guitar.

I cannot imagine the exact same everything with just a different 24.75 to 25 scale "sounding" different and my ear is pretty darn good. But that's me . . .

Here's a good Lollar P90 demo . . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66HSddJCJ1Q

And, now my nearest Hagstrom dealer is struggling to find me a Tri-P90 SS in distribution. Haven't given up but not as simple as calling KMC and they ship one out . . . apparently. I think perhaps this Chinese transition just hasn't worked well, period, from supply chain to quality to support.

My health is going downhill again so if I disappear on you . . . don't take it personally!

Happy Holidays . . .

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:00 pm

Aw wow dude.. I recall when you vanished for a good while towards the end of the summer I think, I was putting out the call for you. I'm wondering about Bredo these days. I know his pain levels were sort of unpleasant versus where the expectation was for him based on where he was healthwise. Don't know much more as I've not been able to reach him via PM. And I know he probably is not getting any email about the PM's I send him since w the new board you have to reset yourself to get prompted by email if you receive a PM.

I've heard the standard Lollar 90's many many times, but the set that went into the triple Godin were a new set custom made for that specific guitar, and were wound differently and specifically very hot. These are the specific issues with modern P90's that I've been filling up pages in the board on different threads moaning about how these guys just don't know how to amp up the output "Just Enough" for modern recording and stage work, while keeping the character of those old original 52-56 Les Pauls and all the sublime Specials and Juniors. Even Gibson--IMHO--muffs the process up. In terms of a modern P90, the Hagstrom P90-S is the best I've played or heard. I do however, like this vintage repro, extremely faithful, by (you guessed it) Manlius, very very much. The Manlius PAF Legend will be going into whatever I wind up buying. The Howling Goat P90:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Mx9nJ4eLC0

Anyhow, keep on keeping on. Let me know if you nail the SSwede P90. Any one of the stores should rightfully order one from KMC for you like they did for me from Ash. As far as this--

I think perhaps this Chinese transition just hasn't worked well, period, from supply chain to quality to support.


Unsure of what you meant by transition? They moved all their equipment to the Chinese plant back in 06 or 08, when they resurrected the brand. Hagstrom made guitars from the late 50's to the mid 80's. Then they stopped. They resumed again around 2006, and did so by setting up production in Asia. Originally I believe the first factory was in Indonesia, but it moved to China quickly afterward. The Northen Series was always just a small offshoot of the main, MIC line. Since they returned to business around 10 yrs ago as mentioned, manufacturing began in Asia overseen by an American luthier (in cooperation with the Hagstrom family and the company's mentioned in the article below) who apparently shot scans of the vintage items and set up production to kick it all off.

Cool little writeup of the whole thing from Digital Trades:

Change Language:
Groovy Hagström Guitars Make A Comeback

U.S. Music brings this quirky Swedish guitar – once a favorite of Frank Zappa, Joe Walsh, and Jimi Hendrix – back to the U.S. market. "In a world of normal guitars, they take you off the beaten path!"

In 1967 Frank Zappa posed for a series of print ads pitching an offbeat Swedish guitar line called Hagström to an American audience. Looking like Gibson's funky younger brother but sounding like nothing else on the market, Hagström guitars appeared in a series of edgy Zappa spots that cast them in a coveted oddball niche for years to come. They would attract stars as diverse as Elvis, Jimi Hendrix, and Joe Walsh of the Eagles before a crush of low-cost competitors squeezed them out of production in 1983. In the years that followed, one thing became apparent: Hagström guitars might be gone, but the music world's fascination with them wasn't. A cult following for the defunct Hagström line persisted until 2004, when an international partnership including Canada's JAM Industries came together to bring it back. Since then, the guitar maker has built a line of Hagströms based closely on its most popular models from the past, re-creating the quirks that made Hagström just unusual enough to love. "The world has a lot of 'normal' guitars," says Jay Marino, Hagström product manager for American distributor U.S. Music, a division of JAM. "These take you off the beaten path. They do their own thing, they have their own sound, they have their own look, and they really can capture something different from the norm."

The unique story of the Hagström company makes its current guitar line, in effect, a throwback to a throwback. Founded by Albin Hagström in 1925, Hagström started as a manufacturer and importer of accordions based out of Älvdalen, Sweden. When the company began making electric guitars in 1958, some of its accordion-making materials and production techniques were repurposed, yielding some of the guitars' quirky features. A distinctive pearloid celluloid finish previously used on its accordions became one of the visual hallmarks of Hagström's early guitars. The line was characterized by familiar body shapes – as in the Hagström Viking model, which resembles the Gibson 335, and the Swede model, which resembles the Les Paul – but always with a twist. "They look like Gibsons, but they sound totally different and they play totally different," says Marino.

Most notably, Hagström created an ultra-thin neck – billed as the fastestplaying neck in the world – along with the innovation that made it work: the HExpander truss rod. Providing tension at both ends and running the entire length of the neck, Hagström's rigid yet lightweight alloy truss rod was engineered to support its unusually thin neck and extremely low action. Hagström also developed proprietary pickups including the Custom 58 and Custom 62, handwound in Sweden, that shaped their guitars' inimitable sound. These elements laid the groundwork for Hagström's most successful models, including the semi-hollow-body Viking; the solidbody Swede; the higher-end, set-neck Super Swede; and the "Jimmy," the archtop jazz guitar named for the famed New York luthier Jimmy D'Aquisto, who was brought in to design it. Hagström also produced bass guitars including the Swede Bass and the Hagström H8, the first-ever mass-produced eight-string bass guitar.

By the early '80s, however, the company was in trouble as competitors set up manufacturing in Asia, turning out instruments at prices European instruments couldn't match. Hagström considered following suit, even producing some prototypes in Japan. By its own account, though, the company was dissatisfied with their quality and chose to shut down production rather than water down the brand. The last of Hagström's original production models went out in 1983.

But the next 21 years would prove that musicians weren't ready to forget about Hagström. Vintage guitar shops, especially in Europe, kept up a brisk trade in the old guitars as the grunge movement and a vintage guitar boom sparked an interest in Hagström guitars' offbeat vibe. Bands including Nirvana and the Foo Fighters kept them in the spotlight long after they'd been discontinued. Finally, in 2004, Hagström was resurrected by a team of three distribution companies – JAM Industries of Canada, Em Nordic of Sweden, and Musik Meyer of Germany – which banded together under the name Tricor AB. (U.S. Music entered the alliance with its acquisition by JAM in 2009.) The new Hagström also established a Swedish office with input from the founding Hagström family. "The brand had such an interesting sound and unique look that these three companies felt it could again flourish in the m.i. market," says Marino. "They had maintained their visibility for so long that reissuing them looked like a promising idea."

In the new Hagström line, designers reintroduced a range of classic models – anchored by the Viking, the Swede, the Super Swede, and the HB-8 bass – that have been engineered as closely as possible to their original body shapes and specs. "Specifically we tried to stay true to the original design of both the neck and the electronics," says Marino, "because that was really the essence of what made these guitars worth remanufacturing." The ultra-thin Hagström neck has been re-created along with the authentic H-Expander truss rod introduced in the '60s. The familiar Hagström logo looks like it could have been pulled straight out of the same decade. In another signature feature, this Hagström line has been equipped with "Resonator" fingerboards made from a composite of four woods, rather than cut from a single piece, which are fused together to produce a unique resonance. Later this year the guitar maker will even bring back the pearlescent celluloid finish, reformulated to modern standards, that gave its first guitars their unique look.

Hagström's initial line of new instruments, manufactured under the "Vintage" series, were entrusted to David Lee, a Brooklyn-born luthier who's been studying Hagström construction since the 1990s. Lee now operates a factory in China where the Vintage series is produced. More recently, however, Hagström has launched and spotlighted its "Northen" series – Swedish for "north" – made entirely in Europe. Comprising higher-end versions of the Swede and Super Swede, with a Viking model coming soon, Northen series instruments are handmade with premium electronics and African mahogany bodies at a Hagström facility in the Czech Republic. To re-create Hagström's proprietary pickups at a high level, the company has partnered with Lundgren Pickups of Sweden, which handles all the wiring and electronics for the Northen series. "This takes us really close to the original production," says Marino. "I think the Northen series will be key to taking the Hagström brand forward, showing musicians that this is a European company making high-end instruments, but at a price point that's not hard to grasp onto."

Set in the $600-$1,200 range, Hagström occupies a crucial niche for U.S. Music, fitting squarely between its higher-end Parker guitar line and its lower-cost Washburn line. As Hagström's sole distributor in the United States, the company has the task of advancing a brand that saturated Europe in its heyday but occupied only a small but distinctive corner in the U.S. As Marino says, "It's almost like the Gibson of Europe. There's so much more of it there because it was made there. Here, it's recognized but it never arrived en masse." Since becoming affiliated with Hagström in 2009, U.S. Music has pursued a strategy in line with its vibe, placing the guitars mainly in vintage and specialty guitar shops and promoting it to players who both reject the generic and want, as Marino puts it, "more guitar for the money."

But maybe most importantly, Hagström's marketing team has played into the brand's most indelible links to artists and musical communities. With its oddball personality, Hagström has thrived in punk and indie circles with crossover to the broader rock music world, sometimes making a quirky second guitar for players who want to invoke something out of the ordinary. "It gives them a different angle," says Marino. "It has its own rock 'n' roll character and gives them a different avenue to go down on a tone level." Pat Smear of the Foo Fighters and Nirvana has become one of its most potent present-day ambassadors. Among its other artists Hagström counts Ryan Ross (Panic! At The Disco), Sharief Hobley (John Legend), Steve Fekete (Avril Lavigne, David Archuleta), and Aaron McClain (the Marc Anthony Band). While not an official endorser, the breakout band "Fun." also plays several classic Hagström guitars, helping to vault the brand from the indie scene into the mainstream. Poetically, Hagström has even brought in second-generation endorser Dweezil Zappa to reenact the iconic ads his father starred in more than 40 years ago.

"Hagström has always been a brand that's been built up through the artists who play it," says Marino, "but Zappa is one of my personal favorites because he was so off-the-wall that he was kind of his own entity. He had that oddball persona to him, and that's what these guitars are about. It's one of those underground niche brands that's built up over time, and obviously we want to take it to the next level."


Anyhow, enough of that.
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Thu Dec 15, 2016 6:46 pm

Didn't die today . . . :applause:

Anyway, my Hag dealer is still waiting on KMC to tell them when/if I can get a tri-pup SS. Meanwhile, the price on these is just not bad at all. I wonder how they play comparatively to a real or reissue 55 or 56?

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/LPST60TSVCH

Put a Stetsbar on it and go . . . :stir:

It does have a 60s Slim-taper instead of the 50s I'd prefer but most all modern guitars, even my Godin, come closer to that profile. Shredders probably like them . . .

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:18 pm

I think they're crap. I played so many of those things late last year and this year it's not even funny. I must have played every single one of those in NYC that were publicly for sale.... fretting out and buzzing on nearly every other one of them under the pressure of store demo, just an awkward build quality. I could not find one I loved let alone one that played smooth and easy.

I WILL say they were better than most of the Specials that I played from this year.. they were just torture. Like fighting a rabid cat. Which is a disappointment because the Special, when a good ol one, is my favorite Lester. (Not kidding.)
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Fri Dec 16, 2016 9:13 am

BTW, if it wasn't clear, by Specials I meant the standard Les Paul Special, mostly the double cuts, non Tribute edition. Why a1960's tribute would be built resembling the ingredients in the classic Lester running up to 56 is beyond me, btw.
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Fri Dec 16, 2016 10:10 pm

Thanks, good to know, since I'd be buying blind online. Surprised at the price and, as usual, "you get what you play for".

I liked REO Speedwagon for like 10 minutes back in like 1977. Year I gradiated H/S . . .

Epiphone has a nice "looking" black 55 P90 reissue but never played one of those either . . .

I've played a few other Epi's over the years. Hit and miss. Some borderline great and others complete butt.

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby Doctor Turn » Sat Dec 17, 2016 9:39 am

They were so frustrating. Naturally they weren't all absolutely horrible, but the nuts are cut terribly the action always awkward and they're just never comfortable. They feel very different versus a good standard or special from a good year. They feel cheap and you have to fight with them. I could sit for an hour in guitar center with a dot or wild Kat and even get a little audience of two or three going, but I could never last more than five minutes on the one guitar I went in with the money to buy, the Les Paul Special as well as the Tribute with the p90s.

Look what popped on the verb... Not the hardtail version of course but they look great.. two actually
Hagstrom H-IIN 1972 Sunburst https://reverb.com/item/3552860-hagstro ... 2-sunburst

This one in all black at a total steal price (it's birch like the burst)
Hagstrom HIIN 1970s https://reverb.com/item/3551998-hagstrom-hiin-1970s

Never saw two on there at the same time. People must need Christmas money. These guitars don't give out, they're built like tanks.
Carvin Weaponry:
1985 DC150K (koa) Stereo, M22N/M22SD w/black hardware.
1985 100 Watt X Amp 2 x 12 combo (XV212) upgraded w/ 2 Vintage 30's
...and other gear.

https://soundcloud.com/the_heavy_clouds

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:03 pm

Working on a goldtop Godin P90 Summit. Dealer going out of business. About $100 apart at the moment. These are $1695 at MF or Sweetwater and I offered $999 free ship. They are at $1149 plus $35 ship. I guess that's $200, huh? Summits are hardtails but I've been wanting to try a Stetsbar and Eric and I have emailed so much on various guitars that we are on a first name basis now. I think he will cut me a deal on the no drill tremolo just to get the advertisement [perhaps just to get me to shut up? :think: ]. Also, Eric "thinks" he has one that would work on a Hag too but would like to custom fit it to make sure. So, if I find the right hardtail Hag, I may go that route if one should it pop up? Kinda liking that Super Deluxe even with the humbuckers . . . 25 1/2 on a semi-hollow :applause:

Going to try my Hag dealer one more time tomorrow to see wassup but they are getting frustrated with KMC . . . which is what is making me nervous too. Hence, my earlier rant about problems with Hag distribution . . .

I cannot walk at the moment [literally]. Pain is so bad in my ankles, feet, and toes. Pi$$er . . . :wall:

Hands are feeling better though so I can crawl over and turn on my Egnater :rockon:

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Re: 1972 Hagstrom HIIN OT and others....

Postby canon_mutant » Sun Dec 18, 2016 8:16 pm

So, now I have choice of black or gold at $1049 + $35 . . . :think:

Kinda diggin' the black cuz it's "limited" . . . wish I could play them both though!

Will let them know tomorrow after I talk to the Hag dealer again.

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