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Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 4:56 pm
by Cynical
They start talking and immediately it's two dads saying "music is dead because they lost t3h bl00z".

Uh, no. Music existed outside of a tiny 1960s bubble. Believe it or not, there is a world outside of what Boomers experienced growing up!

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 6:07 pm
by Omsong
Cynical wrote:They start talking and immediately it's two dads saying "music is dead because they lost t3h bl00z".

Uh, no. Music existed outside of a tiny 1960s bubble. Believe it or not, there is a world outside of what Boomers experienced growing up!


Hey, those 'two dads' are younger than me! :lol: BTW, there are people still living on this planet who are older than 30 and their opinion and experience still counts. True, they have a different perception of what good music is, and it's not the pablum that is force fed to the masses today by the entertainment industry money machines. Anyway, they are talking about a specific musical form called "Rock", that was heavily influenced by the Blues, and that extended from the late 50's into the early 90's; not an insignificant period of time.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 6:50 pm
by Cynical
I'm over 30 myself.

The fact that you would claim "classic" radio isn't pablum but more recent radio is proves my point. If you believe the radio, Black Sabbath was defined by a simple verse-chorus song and an edit of Iron Man with its extended bridge and coda nearly removed to turn it from a six-and-a-half-minute progressive heavy metal song into a 3 minute hard rock song. If you believe the radio, The Beatles were nothing but a dumb pop band (in fairness, aside from a couple songs on Sargent Pepper's, that's pretty much exactly what they were). If you believe the radio, Rush was defined by a simple catchy song with spacey keyboards, not a 20+ minute long epic. If you believe the radio, Judas Priest was defined by a bunch of simple mid-tempo two-riff songs, not "Victim of Changes" or "Painkiller". The Rolling Stones made about 20 million hits with just two simple riffs repeated over and over and over and over and over...

Radio music was always dumb, lowest-common-denominator fare. Boomers convincing themselves otherwise because everything that ever happened to a boomer in the '60s WAS OMG THE MOST IMPORTANT CULTURAL TOUCHSTONE EVER is ridiculous.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:50 pm
by Omsong
We're each entitled to our opinions.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:36 pm
by HarlowTheFish
I'm 20 and pretty much exclusively listen to modern (mid 2000s onwards) rock, from its flannel-clad indie form to Meshuggah and everything in between. I think part of it, musically, is that the scene is a lot less stylistically set in stone: I hear as much (if not more) jazz- and classical-influenced rock as more blues-based stuff. A lot of it comes from musicians who listen to and are influenced by a much wider variety of music, from Nick Johnston's bluesy-shreddy craziness to Polyphia adding modern R&B and pop tones to instrumental rock (and you can't get more guitar-driven than instrumental). We don't really have "teh blooz" or "teh brootz" or "JAAAZZZZ" as these super defined styles to as great an extent as before, because the focus isn't on the style as much as the final product.
I can only really speak for myself, but I'm just as likely to ask "what would Springsteen do?" as "what would Mark Holcomb do?". Ditto for Steve Harris and Dave Hollingworth on bass, or Bartolomé Calatayud and Mike Dawes. I have a hard time explaining what I play when asked because what do you call jazz chords in odd time signatures with pop-punk vocals and an 80s guitar tone? The guitar is doing fine, except in the top 40, and the last time that happened was Nirvana.

Genuine question/offer: if any of you guys have anything "vintage" that you'd be interested in seeing the modern take on, let me know. I've got a ton of really cool artists that I'd love to introduce to people, and I love talking music.

K gonna get off my soapbox now :mrgreen:

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 6:56 am
by Casual Madman
Cynical wrote:Radio music was always dumb, lowest-common-denominator fare.


That may depend on where you spent the 70s. The North Texas area had two really amazing album rock stations back then - KZEW 98FM (The Zoo, #RIP my first-loved radio station) and KFWD 102.1 (later rebranded as KTXQ, Q102, also now #RIP).

Both played deep tracks as a part of their regular programming, along with "event" plays like tracking a full new Queen or Led Zeppelin album, and (one of my favorites), "concert echoes" - they'd note the songs played at a concert in order, then play them back immediatley after the show (with "crowd noise"), for your ride home or for those who couldn't attend.

Once a year or so, you'd get the Beatles A-to-Z or Led Zeppelin A-to-Z (and they'd leave out one song, awarding a prize to the first person to notice).

A Q102 DJ impressed me with the first "mash up" I can recall, before that was even a thing - he played samples (before that was a thing, either) of "Give Peace a Chance" over the just-released "We Will Rock You."

I knew local radio was in trouble in the early 80s, when the number-one aftertnoon drive DJ at the Zoo got fired for deviating from the playlist. Think about that: the guy bringing the second most listeners in the market (morning drive is always the most overall) to your station. Axed for doing what he did best.

Even today, radio in DFW is better than average - there's a "classic rock" station with a reasonably deep catalog, a "hard rock/modern rock" station that has a Stern-ish talk show for afternoon drive, and a recent startup playing "alternative rock" of all ages, new to classic. Plus a local nonprofit whose programming is all over the map, from blues to metal to Native American chanting.

But I do miss the opportunity to hear new stuff that sounds good on the airwaves - I've yet to hear Great Van Fleet, or Mastodon, or Halestorm (to pick a few random modern acts I like) on the radio.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:00 am
by gumbynotpokey
WMRY in St Louis, during the 80's, used a classical music radio station format (academic style, super chill DJ voices, very formal) while playing ultra-deep cut and whole albums of classic rock and metal. Their rotation demands were rigorous. I'll never forget the time we were driving around outside the city and I heard the DJ say, "Now we had a number of callers ask for Clapton. And while we like Clapton, he's a bit predictable. And as you all know, we played a Cream album back in April. Due to the number and nature of the requests we will play a side of Delaney and Bonnie and Friends, but I'm warning the listeners: please mark your calendars and don't even think of calling in about Clapton for at least 6 months. I am warning the listeners."

Killer calm. Killer hilarious.

What a station.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:15 am
by ElfDude
Cynical wrote: If you believe the radio, The Beatles were nothing but a dumb pop band (in fairness, aside from a couple songs on Sargent Pepper's, that's pretty much exactly what they were).


Hey now... you can say what you want about my wife or my religion, but don't be dissin' The Beatles!

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:19 am
by arahobob
Casual Madman wrote:
Cynical wrote:Radio music was always dumb, lowest-common-denominator fare.


But I do miss the opportunity to hear new stuff that sounds good on the airwaves - I've yet to hear Great Van Fleet, or Mastodon, or Halestorm (to pick a few random modern acts I like) on the radio.



I have one local station, 95.9 (Greater Media / Beasley Broadcast Group) that plays stuff like Greta Van Fleet and Halestorm, and other new stuff like that. They don't really get too wild with their selections though - just safe modern hard rock.

Mastodon? Only on the local college radio stations I'm afraid.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 11:44 am
by Doctor Turn
Cynical wrote:I'm over 30 myself.

The fact that you would claim "classic" radio isn't pablum but more recent radio is proves my point. If you believe the radio, Black Sabbath was defined by a simple verse-chorus song and an edit of Iron Man with its extended bridge and coda nearly removed to turn it from a six-and-a-half-minute progressive heavy metal song into a 3 minute hard rock song. If you believe the radio, The Beatles were nothing but a dumb pop band (in fairness, aside from a couple songs on Sargent Pepper's, that's pretty much exactly what they were). If you believe the radio, Rush was defined by a simple catchy song with spacey keyboards, not a 20+ minute long epic. If you believe the radio, Judas Priest was defined by a bunch of simple mid-tempo two-riff songs, not "Victim of Changes" or "Painkiller". The Rolling Stones made about 20 million hits with just two simple riffs repeated over and over and over and over and over...

Radio music was always dumb, lowest-common-denominator fare. Boomers convincing themselves otherwise because everything that ever happened to a boomer in the '60s WAS OMG THE MOST IMPORTANT CULTURAL TOUCHSTONE EVER is ridiculous.


There's so much wrong with this post I wouldn't even know where to begin.

1) I'm on a phone right now so a long post is almost impossible. But I'm a try..

2) just because a great song was shortened for airplay, doesn't mean the greatness of the song is nullified. It's just shortened. That says nothing about the aesthetics of the content and everything about the advertising needs of the broadcast vehicle. That's just simply that.

3) if you look at the top one hundred songs from any of the years of the sixties and seventies (I'm a gen X guy, so I have no vested interest in promoting boomers, whom a have ZERO love for.. they're basically responsible via their behavior in their latterly years for the condition of the world and the crud the millennials are stuck with and are unfairly blamed for), and compare that with the top 100 of any of the past five to ten years, and see no qualitative decline.. then I would like you to point me in the direction of the immortal classics that compare with the Temptations, the Doors, Aretha Franklin, led Zeppelin, Loving Spoonful, Sabbath, Mountain, Hendrix, Bowie, Cream, the Beatles, the Stones, Purple, The Four Tops, Rufus and Chaka Khan, Zappa, King Crimson, Yes, The Animals.. the old BeeGees, even over hit wonders like Brandy You're A Fine Girl, Drift Away by Dobie Gray... On and on and on. Point me there. The above represents about eight or nine years. Think 2010-2018. That short.

You really telling me there's been no qualitative difference between these bands from that stretch of years (we can stretch further) which was radio music some FM, mostly AM.. and tell me who the equivalent immortals are from the past ten years. Cardi? Lil Pump? Kanye? Beyonce? Robin Thicke?

As I write I start laughing. Even millennials themselves know that the radio music they're stuck with is a different animal. The entire business itself has withered, shrunken, and atrophied.. it's entirely natural that it's become more bottom line oriented, risk averse, and focused on lowest common denominator material.

Even though aesthetic quality is not mathematically or scientifically provable, and anyone can stand up and say Lil Pump is as good as BB King (and we'd be forced to respect his opinion) at this late date to say that we have been subject to no qualitative decline on the radio--or what's left of it-- is just absurd. I rarely hear this anymore.

Not saying there isn't wonderful material out there-- there is gobs and gobs of new music to be found... but to say the radio and even pop in general is the same now as it was in the sixties and seventies specifically.. holy guacamole.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:06 pm
by gumbynotpokey
I'll jump in now.

1. The wild west of large numbers of venture start-up bands and recording contracts - where everyone is taking a big risk - has been over for a long time. The essence of my point is my point - not the notion that risk no longer exists or that there are no exceptions to what I'm saying. I'm merely pointing out that the golden days or studio work and album deals - those days are over. It's a sea change at every level.

2. Go to youtube reaction channels where millenials hear classic rock for the first time and react. They are stunned by the musicianship, songwriting, and live performance raw ability - and are often finally saddened.

3. Electronic dance music, computers writing scores, click tracks that must be obeyed - the list goes on. The organic nature is vastly diminished from what it was in the past. AI is not a better composer than analog humans that have neuronal empathy to music and a mind to go with it.

Lastly, I share these not to make a point or argue or incite a rebuttal. Rather, I share these out of the joy of witnessing these kinds of expressions - those kinds that share a certain rawness. They are three of my absolute favorites.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71Ti_TdpJHE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xmRWj7gJEU

This one is longer, but I beg you to watch and listen to it all (headphones).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03juO5oS2gg

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 2:17 pm
by spudmunkey
Do you think the time of day that you might be listening to the radio has anything to do with it?

I used to listen to the radio much more in the evenings. This has always seemed, to me, when the DJ had more control over the songs that they were playing during their shifts. During the day, during commute and work hours, the radio has always seemed more formulaic. And unfortunately, this is when I typically listen to the radio most. However, back in the day, when I was younger, I would be listening to the radio more in the evenings, and this is when you were here the mandatory Metallica, the long-form interview shows, Etc.

I bring this up, because this is still the case with many stations. If they have 1 2 or 3 hour shows dedicated to a subgenre, those are going to be in the evening. They aren't going to be at 2 pm. This is the same reason, i imagine, that Headbangers ball was never on at 11 a.m. This is why 120 Minutes was never on a Sunday afternoon at 4 p.m.

Granted, I'm only 39, so I don't have the extra couple of decades that some of y'all have... But it's seemed consistent through the last 2 to two and a half decades or so.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 5:30 pm
by Cynical
Wow, I ignore this thread for a few days, and it explodes! Anyways...
Doctor Turn wrote:2) just because a great song was shortened for airplay, doesn't mean the greatness of the song is nullified. It's just shortened. That says nothing about the aesthetics of the content and everything about the advertising needs of the broadcast vehicle. That's just simply that.

Disagreed. Structure and development are critical parts of musical expression. Butchering those aspects in order to make a song fit a mold is likely to completely ruin the song.

Furthermore, the reason for the butchering extends beyond the need to play commercials (Iron Man is a bit more than six minutes, not nine minutes, a DJ could fit the full version + one other short song into a block without having any problems). The business model behind rock demanded that bands be basically interchangeable musically so when one group of young pretty faces aged out, another was immediately there to take their place with more of the same so the suits could keep selling more plastic records. Every hit song had to be the same thing so they could sell it again with a different group of faces in four months; if you gave listeners something actually unique, there was a thread that they'd demand more of something that couldn't be easily assembled as though from a factory.

3) if you look at the top one hundred songs from any of the years of the sixties and seventies (I'm a gen X guy, so I have no vested interest in promoting boomers, whom a have ZERO love for.. they're basically responsible via their behavior in their latterly years for the condition of the world and the crud the millennials are stuck with and are unfairly blamed for), and compare that with the top 100 of any of the past five to ten years, and see no qualitative decline.. then I would like you to point me in the direction of the immortal classics that compare with the Temptations, the Doors, Aretha Franklin, led Zeppelin, Loving Spoonful, Sabbath, Mountain, Hendrix, Bowie, Cream, the Beatles, the Stones, Purple, The Four Tops, Rufus and Chaka Khan, Zappa, King Crimson, Yes, The Animals.. the old BeeGees, even over hit wonders like Brandy You're A Fine Girl, Drift Away by Dobie Gray... On and on and on. Point me there. The above represents about eight or nine years. Think 2010-2018. That short.

I wouldn't say that any of the radio songs by any of the above bands are "immortal classics" (admittedly, I've never heard Zappa or King Crimson on the radio) more than "99 Problems", "Let's Get Retarded", or "Single Ladies" are -- they're hits that were produced in the glossiest studios that a label could afford. Make me choose between spending an hour in a room that plays "Sympathy for the Devil" non-stop or "Say Hi to the Bad Guy" non-stop, and I'm going to listen to some Jay-Z. Some of those bands did far more than that, but that wasn't the stuff that got played on the radio (I thought Led Zeppelin were the lamest, most boring thing ever and couldn't understand why my dad loved them so much until he played their debut album in the car on a road trip, and I got to hear something that wasn't "Immigrant Song", "Whole Lotta Love", "Black Dog", or "Stairway to Heaven").

If the studio tools of the 21st century existed then, Aretha Franklin would have done everything she could to sound exactly like Beyonce does today. We've got more tools for making everyone the same now, but everyone was trying as hard as they could to sound like everyone else even in the '60s.

As I write I start laughing. Even millennials themselves know that the radio music they're stuck with is a different animal. The entire business itself has withered, shrunken, and atrophied.. it's entirely natural that it's become more bottom line oriented, risk averse, and focused on lowest common denominator material.

Millennials are, on the whole, unfortunately dumb enough to believe the things Boomers tell them. Boomers endlessly repeat "OMG OUR CLASSIC ROCK WAS THE BEST MUSIC EVAR!!!!", so millennials go along with it. Rock music was always a business that consisted of selling a lifestyle to kids, and as such, it was always focused on lowest common denominator material.

spudmunkey wrote:Do you think the time of day that you might be listening to the radio has anything to do with it?

I used to listen to the radio much more in the evenings. This has always seemed, to me, when the DJ had more control over the songs that they were playing during their shifts. During the day, during commute and work hours, the radio has always seemed more formulaic. And unfortunately, this is when I typically listen to the radio most. However, back in the day, when I was younger, I would be listening to the radio more in the evenings, and this is when you were here the mandatory Metallica, the long-form interview shows, Etc.

I bring this up, because this is still the case with many stations. If they have 1 2 or 3 hour shows dedicated to a subgenre, those are going to be in the evening. They aren't going to be at 2 pm. This is the same reason, i imagine, that Headbangers ball was never on at 11 a.m. This is why 120 Minutes was never on a Sunday afternoon at 4 p.m.

Granted, I'm only 39, so I don't have the extra couple of decades that some of y'all have... But it's seemed consistent through the last 2 to two and a half decades or so.

The fact that you can say "Mandatory Metallica" and be sure that someone who grew up listening to a different hard rock station than you shows just how formatted even that was, and how much of a death grip Clear Channel had on the radio then.

So, a question -- what's the heaviest song you ever heard them play on "Mandatory Metallica"? Probably either "Seek and Destroy" or "Master of Puppets", right? And they played a lot more post-Burton sell-out crap than anything from the first three albums, right? How many times did they play an actual thrasher -- Hit the Lights, Whiplash, Phantom Lord, Metal Militia, Fight Fire With Fire, Trapped Under Ice, Battery, Disposable Heroes, or Damage Inc.? Never, right?

All of that stuff was just as controlled by "the format" as the endless waves of band-of-the-nanosecond lame alt-rock every afternoon was, hence why they shied away from playing anything that would make a timid old lady change the station and stuck to playing "Enter Sandman" forever.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 6:49 pm
by Omsong
When I was "coming of age" in rural American the late '60s, I used to hunt the AM band for what we called 'underground stations'. Occasionally during late winter evenings it was possible to tune in WBZ from Boston or WLS from Chicago as they faded in and out of reception. They both ran late night alternate music formats, broadcasting music that was unlike anything available in any other broadcast format at the time. I recall the first time I heard one of Ravi Shankar's sitar ragas wafting out of my transistor radio speaker, it was like 'OMG', or Hendrix's' Purple Haze' or Cream's 'Crossroads'. I discovered the world wasn't only black and white but in cinematic color, and that music could be a very powerful force for personal and global change. There was a tremendous amount of energy and individual creativity flowing in the music industry in those days.

Even local AM stations had their popular DJ' personalities that played set lists based on their's and their audience feedback. We all had our favorite DJs and knew when to tune in to their programming, sometimes playing nonstop music - and screw the advertisers. Then, one by one, they were bought up by Clear Channel and replaced with robotic, hour on the hour repeats of the same twenty top Billboard songs. At first, a few local DJs remained to announce the titles, and read the news and weather forecasts, until they, too, were replaced by machines. The music was dying a slow death, while every radio station danced to the same, dictatorial command from On High. It really didn't matter which one you listened to any more as they all sounded the same. Those same conglomerates, for many years now, have controlled exactly the music we hear and how it gets produced and promoted. It's the Terminator world controlled by machines and a few 'human' men (and women) who think and act like them.

Guitar content inserted here - machines don't need guitarists since they can synthesize any instrument. Today, we have perfect rhythm tracks supporting perfect melody and chordal instruments and overlayed by near perfect, pitch corrected, human vocals. Based on what I hear on YouTube, those maddening computer script reciters as getting more and more 'human like'. Soon, the machines won't even need human vocalists for their songs, and they will use artificial reality 3-D projections for their stage shows, too! Don't be surprised that AI starts composing all the songs and lyrics, as well, in just a couple of years

Thankfully, we now have YouTube and the streaming web based music services that are doing much to revive music creativity for the masses. The bottom line is that it's an issue of freedom of choice. Sure hope the Silicon Valley gods don't start interfering with them, too.

Eventually, those 'reasoning' AI machines with think, hey, we don't need music so why bother? We don't need humans, either....

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 7:57 pm
by spudmunkey
Cynical wrote:]
The fact that you can say "Mandatory Metallica" and be sure that someone who grew up listening to a different hard rock station than you shows just how formatted even that was, and how much of a death grip Clear Channel had on the radio then.

So, a question -- what's the heaviest song you ever heard them play on "Mandatory Metallica"? Probably either "Seek and Destroy" or "Master of Puppets", right? And they played a lot more post-Burton sell-out crap than anything from the first three albums, right? How many times did they play an actual thrasher -- Hit the Lights, Whiplash, Phantom Lord, Metal Militia, Fight Fire With Fire, Trapped Under Ice, Battery, Disposable Heroes, or Damage Inc.? Never, right?
.


You make an a lot of assumptions. I mean... they did make a point of not repeating "the hits". At least two of the three in this string of songs once per week were pre "black album", and it was a pretty good mix of "deep cuts". The time period im thinking of, there was only the black album, and maaaaybe "Load". Not that it's really worth anything... but that was the also three most minor in terms of significance in my post. :-p

They also used to play Testament, Anthrax, etc, but only after 11pm.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:36 am
by Cynical
San Francisco must have very different radio than Texas.

I hit my teenage years in the "Garage Inc."/"S&M" era of Metallica, so they had plenty of '90s crap, but I asked a few friends in their 40s from different Texas cities, and they all remember it pretty much to how I do.

In the early-to-mid nineties, they pulled from the following list exclusively: Enter Sandman, Wherever I May Roam, One, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Fade to Black, Master of Puppets, Seek and Destroy, in that order of frequency. At least two of Enter Sandman, Wherever I May Roam, and One were always played.

When Load and Reload came out, King Nothing and The Memory Remains were added to that at a similar frequency to One.

When Garage Inc. came out, Turn the Page and Whiskey in the Jar replaced King Nothing and The Memory Remains. At that point, the format became one of the Black Album songs, one of the Garage Inc. songs, and then one of the '80s songs, with it being One or For Whom the Bell Tolls well over half the time. I heard Master of Puppets and Seek and Destroy exactly once each during this era.

This exact formula, once a week, was how Metallica was presented if you lived in Texas. Yeah. Go radio at night, so much better than radio during the day.

If anything, in Houston, mid-day was the best time of the day for radio; that's when you could generally count on them playing "Rainbow in the Dark" or "Breaking the Law" as well as some AC/DC stuff (albeit, from the Brian Johnson era or very occasionally Highway to Hell, because playing the more varied and interesting AC/DC material was certainly never going to happen on the radio in Houston). Still very far from adventurous, still sticking to the most predictable and formatted material of the bands involved (when "Breaking the Law" is the deepest you're willing to go with Judas Priest, ugh...).

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 6:28 am
by Doctor Turn
Cynical wrote:...


Your statements like "If the studio tools of the 21st century existed then, Aretha Franklin would have done everything she could to sound exactly like Beyonce does today," are bizarre to me. Do you mean stylistically? Musically? Are you saying if Aretha had digital, plug-ins, and ProTools then she would not have recorded You Make Me Feel Like A Natural Woman, etc, but would have gone in the direction of Single Ladies? I think if you would have told that to both Aretha AND Beyonce they would have both busted out laughing.

So I'll just rattle off some classics from the 60's-70's (most from 1968 since I just pulled up a top 200 for that year), and you rattle off the modern day equivalents that are on the radio:

Space Oddity, Bohemian Rhapsody, Hey Joe, Purple Haze, Sittin On The Dock of the Bay, Sunshine of Your Love, Crimson & Clover, Lady Madonna, Paperback Writer, Born To Be Wild, Magic Carpet Ride, Hurdy Gurdy Man (Donovan), Atlantis (same), Hush (Purple.. this was a HIT), Dance to the Music (Sly Stone), White Room/Those Were The Days (Cream), I've Gotta Get A Message To You (BeeGees).. I skipped so many but could go on and on.. all those great songs like Woman Woman and Lady Willpower by Gary Puckett and The Union Gap.. all the James Brown, Dionne Warwick, Arethe.. the Doors.. all of this is just the top 200 radio from 1968 but for a few of them at the beginning of my list.

Zappa had two big hits: Valley Girl and Dancin Fool. And Bobby Brown Goes Down was a smash hit two or three separate times in (even he was baffled) Norway of all places! :laughhard:

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:09 am
by UnexplodedCow
Cynical wrote:San Francisco must have very different radio than Texas.

I hit my teenage years in the "Garage Inc."/"S&M" era of Metallica, so they had plenty of '90s crap, but I asked a few friends in their 40s from different Texas cities, and they all remember it pretty much to how I do.

In the early-to-mid nineties, they pulled from the following list exclusively: Enter Sandman, Wherever I May Roam, One, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Fade to Black, Master of Puppets, Seek and Destroy, in that order of frequency. At least two of Enter Sandman, Wherever I May Roam, and One were always played.

When Load and Reload came out, King Nothing and The Memory Remains were added to that at a similar frequency to One.

When Garage Inc. came out, Turn the Page and Whiskey in the Jar replaced King Nothing and The Memory Remains. At that point, the format became one of the Black Album songs, one of the Garage Inc. songs, and then one of the '80s songs, with it being One or For Whom the Bell Tolls well over half the time. I heard Master of Puppets and Seek and Destroy exactly once each during this era.

This exact formula, once a week, was how Metallica was presented if you lived in Texas. Yeah. Go radio at night, so much better than radio during the day.

If anything, in Houston, mid-day was the best time of the day for radio; that's when you could generally count on them playing "Rainbow in the Dark" or "Breaking the Law" as well as some AC/DC stuff (albeit, from the Brian Johnson era or very occasionally Highway to Hell, because playing the more varied and interesting AC/DC material was certainly never going to happen on the radio in Houston). Still very far from adventurous, still sticking to the most predictable and formatted material of the bands involved (when "Breaking the Law" is the deepest you're willing to go with Judas Priest, ugh...).


I'm around the same age, and can agree with that exact songlist for Metallica in the late 90s and y2k. One station would play Disturbed, Anthrax, and a few other odds and ends (anyone remember American Pearl? Yeah, me either).

There was a YouTube video I saw about a month ago that shows statistics on new vs. old music styles, focussing on new styles, and how it was all nearly identical. I noticed it in my teen years: very similar, if not the same chord progressions (if even a different key), same style of lyrics about whatever pop culture had going for it. I kept my head buried in far more underground stuff until getting a PC and discovering the old 80s shedders, which made me realize that we sort of peaked decades ago, and that much of the 90s really were garbage (actual, not the band, which I don't mind despite being very 90s).

As for millennials, that is a whooooole other topic, that relates to me, since I'm technically in that age bracket according to some, or am a last year gen X. I feel like a bit of both in terms of tastes. Definitely got the short end of the job market, though.

There is a reason I don't listen to the radio much at all. About the best thing on is NPR, which is not something I ever thought previously.

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:57 am
by spudmunkey
Cynical wrote:San Francisco must have very different radio than Texas.


For the record, this is when I used to live in Wisconsin, within radio earshot of Milwaukee

Re: "The Death of the Electric Guitar"

Posted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:44 pm
by wickid
Doctor Turn wrote:...Zappa had two big hits: Valley Girl and Dancin Fool. And Bobby Brown Goes Down was a smash hit two or three separate times in (even he was baffled) Norway of all places! :laughhard:


Oh man, I am now having flashbacks to my worn out cassette of Zoot Allures Disco Boy-oyyyy .... :mrgreen:
Wasn't the biggest Zappa fan, but loved Zoot, and Ship Too late ... (When I learned of the name of the album, and took a closer look at the artwork ... mere black and white triangles ... I was like *oh yeah* :idea: ) .