Bass contemplations

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brento73
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Bass contemplations

Postby brento73 » Sun May 28, 2017 9:52 am

Hi from the guitar side! :)

Ok, I know a lot of people wander the whole bbs, but I have to admit I haven't really spent any time in the bass forums until the past couple weeks. So, here's what happened:

A friend got a baritone guitar, and I played around with it a little, and started thinking I might get something like that. That evolved into thinking I'd get a 27" 7-string, and then maybe an 8, and then(go big or go home, right?) a multi-scale 8! I love my 6-string SO much(HF2s Fatboy, see signature), that I decided it made sense to get something different.

And that lead me to start looking at basses. I have a friend(different friend) who plays, and my older brother used to play, so I've played around with a few basses over the years. Since the main interest I have in extended range guitars is the low end, and since I'm looking for 'different' to get me out of my comfort zone and learning new things, a bass started making a lot more sense.

With all that in mind, I borrowed a 4-string from a friend(the second one :) ), and have started learning how to actually play it.

So... I'm curious what advice the local bassists might have? I'm wondering what the use-cases are for 5 and 6 string basses, pros and cons, etc. This 4 string I've borrowed is... well, it's a bass, but it's not something I'd have spent money on. That means, while it should be good enough to start learning some proper technique, I'm already thinking about what I want to order from Kiesel :)

Any thoughts, experiences, etc. are much appreciated.

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby gumbynotpokey » Sun May 28, 2017 6:01 pm

Wonderful.

I've played bass since about 1980, and I have never played any other instrument. The last 8 years I've been the only bassist on a worship team that is EXTREMELY eclectic and improvisational (fun), doing 3 services a week, plus a weekly practice. We are very free-form, long instrumental jams, and tons of genres. We improvise from lead sheets. Back in college I played in a cover band that was quite good, actually, doing a bit of pop but mainly rock, hard rock, metal, blues, and blues-rock.

I've gathered some bass bottom lines (no pun intended, I don't think) over many years of playing bass. Here they are in no particular order.

1. The rhythm section component that is comprised of the drummer and the bassist is one machine operated by two people. Lock in with the drummer. You and the drummer should be one. Hit the fundamental of the chord changes at the exact right moment. Pulse the bass with the kick. These are general and wonderful to make totally unconscious. Of course, there is drive rather than pulse, and other needs, or feels.

2. Never play an open string other than the E string. Always fret every note except the open E string. It is very good to get into this habit. Why? Bass is often about patterns (shapes). If you learn the pattern with no open strings, you can move the pattern anywhere you like, with no hesitation. For example, a I-IV-V-1 is a common 12 bar blues shape. Play it closed and it is your friend. Purists will disagree and insert that an open A has its own timbre. They are right. And so am I. If you're playing a 20 seat club of cork-sniffing jazz fans on an upright, play that open A and I'll be proud. Learn your book with zero open strings, bang them out on stage at concert volume, and that open A's timbre disappears like a tonewood debate in the second set.

3. Know the fingerboard: the name and location of every single note on every single string, independent of any other note. This takes time. Many guitarists never achieve this, and claim they don't need to. Start now and keep at it. You won't play notes that you don't know are there, or at least not in certain scenarios - like when you actually want one and can't find it. Bass is about notes and note choices, to a large degree (no pun intended). You want to know your choices.

4. As Abraham Laboriel says, "Bass is the house that everyone else plays in." Or, "The bass IS the band". It's the easiest instrument to play, perhaps, technically (although some would disagree and say it only seems so, as it is relegated to a lesser role in our society, and the instrument is not inherently "easier" per se), but is the hardest to play tastefully. The point here stems from the role of bass in general: to provide the link between rhythm and tone. Bass defines the fundamental, in time. No other instrument is assigned that role as such. If you play a bad down beat tone on a change (a 2 instead of the 1), or the proper note but out of time and out of synch with the drummer (sacrificing "the pocket"), the whole room will take a giant dump. Do your job of defining the rhythm/tone link properly, and the band plays within what you provide. Crap yourself in time/tone and the fun is over for the audience, the band, and the whole room.

5. Regarding right hand technique, alternate your index and middle finger on every note. Assuming you are playing fingers, force yourself to be disciplined in this way. This discipline is the basis for precision and later for speed. You can develop using your ring finger on your right hand later. You master this now, and can break the rule at the right moment, when needed, later.

6. Regarding left hand (fretting) technique, use your pinky. Depth/girth is achieved by playing the 1 (the chord tone root aka fundamental) with your index finger, letting it ring, and striking the octave (the 8th) of the scale shape (the same note one octave higher) with your pinky holding that 8 down. The 1 by itself sounds totally different from the 1 and 8 together. Also, if you force yourself to use your pinky from the very start, you will have a 3 to 4 fret reach, and be a much more natural feeling player -- in your own skin -- down the road. It will help you relax, rather than fight the instrument.

7. Simple is better, but play tasetfully. Don't over-play. One thing to learn right away is the shape of a 1-3-5-8. Pick any note, let's say an A. The guitarist or keyboard plays a whole note A for 4 beats, and another for 4 beats. Try playing A on the first beat, then the 3, 5 and 8 on respective beats of that first measure. You can also try 1-5-8-5, or other combos. The point here is to learn simple scale tones and how to use them as a "fielder's choice" when allowed by the music. Keep it simple, but tasteful. Not too many notes, not too much complexity. Ultimately, serve the song.

8. "If you can't feel it, don't play it." Bass is about motion and feel. Feel the song and your line physically. Deliver that to the room with your hands. If you can't feel the rhythm structure and where your next note is supposed to be, try a rest rather than a note. You absolutely must FEEL the music.

Lastly, be ok with being ignored, taken for granted, subtly insulted by those playing "real" instruments, overlooked, not complemented, and generally forgotten.

Survival tip: if your band has a keyboard, you can't hear yourself in the mix, and the player can take it, have them keep their left hand ABOVE middle C. Tell them that the area below middle C is your tonal territory and to let you have that job.
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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby brento73 » Sun May 28, 2017 6:57 pm

Thanks! This is exactly the sort of advice/ideas I'm looking for.

1 & 4, totally agree with this. Nothing ruins a performance like a bad rhythm section. No amount of fretboard wizardry from the guitarist or amazing vocals will save it.

2 & 6 won't require adjustment. With the exception of some strummed chords and other 'coffee shop' type stuff, I don't use many open strings on guitar, and I'm comfortable with my pinky already. Getting used to the large stretches and string spacing will take a while, but on these two things I think I'm on the right path, already.

3 is something that, as you said, this guitarist doesn't really know. I can figure out, given a second, but I can't just pick out any note without pause. I'm hoping that taking a more formal approach to learning bass will pay dividends for my guitar playing, as well.

5 is the first hurdle I've come to. I've been playing some scales(and the intro to 'Bombtrack' by Rage Against the Machine), and I can do ok just using one finger, but when I try to alternate them, things go south in a hurry. This is clearly something I'm going to have to focus on right away.

7,8, and the last bits I'm on board with. Although I think being able to play some crazy bass solo, at some point, would be cool, I'm really interested in getting my groove on. Not only is it cool, but I feel like learning to come at a song from the rhythm section will help me flesh out some of my existing songs(and perhaps come up with new ones).

As for bass being 'easier', I think it's a little easier to fake it than a guitar, assuming a person has any sense of rhythm in them. That said, I feel like a lot of people end up playing bass because they want to be in a band, and the bass is the only spot not filled. That's a poor reason to play such a pivotal role.

So, looks like, from you signature line, you have a couple of 4 strings? Thoughts on 5 and 6 strings? I'm not buying anything near-term because I've got the borrowed 4 to practice on, and don't see the sense in spending money until I get some skills under my belt.

Let's say, however, that six months from now I'm really loving it, getting pretty OK, and maybe playing in a band... I could see needing a 5 for some songs, and a 6 gives some more options as far as where a shape can land on the fret board.

What are the cons to more strings? Obviously, the extra width could get in the way, but I did play around with a 6 and a few 5's at a local shop this weekend, and they didn't seem like they'd be too difficult to manage.

If I think I might want a 5/6 at some point, would it make sense to make my first purchase a 5/6 string?

Also, fretless? Thoughts? I suspect most bassists have one of each, but let's say I could afford one really cool bass, should I stick to frets, or fretless?

Anyway, thanks again for such a detailed post! :rockon:

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby MikeBass » Mon May 29, 2017 12:18 am

Welcome to the low end 8)

As far as the number of strings and given your inclinations, I'd actually say go for a 5-string when you feel ready. The switch from 4 to 5 was nearly effortless for me, but going to 6 definitely tripped me up for a while. That being said, I've come back to being a 4-string guy. It all depends on what you want to do though, and having that low B string can be veeery handy.
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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby brento73 » Mon May 29, 2017 7:13 am

Thanks for the welcome!

I'm trying to get the right posture/playing position, which(based on numerous video I've seen) is the bass sitting on the right leg. The thing is, that is really awkward. Maybe it's me? I'm used to having my guitar on my left leg(the bottom of the guitar resting between my legs, sort of). When I put the bass like that, if feels more natural, although the end of the neck IS a little far away.

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby brento73 » Mon May 29, 2017 9:01 pm

Another question!

Anyone played a 30" Vader? I really like the look of walnut, and I also really like not destroying my back, so.... :)

I'm thinking a short-scale Vader, chambered, would save some weight and make a walnut 5-string(or even 6?) less brutal.

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby OakParkMusicGuy » Tue May 30, 2017 2:41 am

The bass is a great instrument!
I only play 5 strings so that's where my thoughts are coming from....
- I like the 17mm string spacing on 5 strings
- bass players generally play bass because they like low notes. the low B string gives you more of that reason. I always recommend this to my students and the ones that get a 4 string always wish they've gotten a 5.
- 5 string offers more fingering options

I tried a 6 string but couldn't take to it. granted it was only a half hour or so.. those extra few low notes - to me - are worth a lot more than those extra few notes.

Enjoy!

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby lucien » Tue May 30, 2017 11:53 am

On the fretless question, the primary reason to go FL is the tone. Most "defanged" basses get rid of the clickety-clack of fretted basses and for poorer players like myself, they allow significantly better definition in plucked notes. The drawback, of course, is having to intonate. This takes a long time and a lot of practice, especially keeping faster passages in tune. And unless you get to the Jaco/Bromberg/etc level, quick runs will always be a little out of tune. Something to keep in mind if intonation is really important - if so, a fretted is lower hanging fruit on an in-tune instrument and will always sound impeccably in tune for complicated stuff.

So generally, stay away from the FL unless a) you have the time to get up to speed on basically relearning how to play the instrument pretty much altogether, :), and b) you have a spare bass you can still gig with in the meantime.

Fortunately, Carvins sound just as good in fretted models as the FL ones do, so FL is only necessary if you specifically need an FL tone. And I don't mean sounding like an upright; not a lot of electrics can do that fretted or not.

That said, I own only one fretted bass (Rick 4003) and I do occasionally get it out. It is nice when all the notes are perfectly in tune :)

LS

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby brento73 » Wed May 31, 2017 5:21 pm

lucien wrote:On the fretless question, the primary reason to go FL is the tone. Most "defanged" basses get rid of the clickety-clack of fretted basses and for poorer players like myself, they allow significantly better definition in plucked notes. The drawback, of course, is having to intonate. This takes a long time and a lot of practice, especially keeping faster passages in tune. And unless you get to the Jaco/Bromberg/etc level, quick runs will always be a little out of tune. Something to keep in mind if intonation is really important - if so, a fretted is lower hanging fruit on an in-tune instrument and will always sound impeccably in tune for complicated stuff.

So generally, stay away from the FL unless a) you have the time to get up to speed on basically relearning how to play the instrument pretty much altogether, :), and b) you have a spare bass you can still gig with in the meantime.

Fortunately, Carvins sound just as good in fretted models as the FL ones do, so FL is only necessary if you specifically need an FL tone. And I don't mean sounding like an upright; not a lot of electrics can do that fretted or not.

That said, I own only one fretted bass (Rick 4003) and I do occasionally get it out. It is nice when all the notes are perfectly in tune :)

LS


Thanks, makes sense. I picked up a used bass from a local shop which plays MUCH better than my friend's loaner, so at least I now have something decent to practice on.

In semi-related news, there's an open-mic tomorrow that I want to sing/play guitar at, and I'm having to practice a bunch today and tomorrow to make sure I still remember my songs :)

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby jokh00 » Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:08 am

My 2 (Euro) cents:

Playing bass is a lot more physically demanding compared to playing the guitar, the size of the instrument and its strings require that you develop hand strength and stamina. I´m not saying that playing the guitar does´nt require hand strength, but play 3 Iron Maiden songs in a row on guitar, then play them on bass-you´ll get the picture. I play 5-string basses exclusively, my main bass is my PB5, which replaced my BB75P. I would definitely recommend getting a 5-string gumbynotpokey wrote about "shapes" and "patterns" becomes even more important on a 5-string, which allows more variations on note selction than a 4-string. I love playing bass, it´s been my obsession for the last 20 years, which is when I swithced over from guitar. Another note on playing 5-strings vs playing 4-string-It requires even more hand/finger strength.

Hope this helps/Jonas

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby gumbynotpokey » Sat Jun 03, 2017 7:16 am

Ok so a little input on fretless and on moving to 5/6.

First, fretless. Here are some thoughts in no particular order.
A. I suppose there are various reasons one might have for getting a fretless. For me, one was tone color. There is nothing that sounds like an upright. There is nothing that sounds like a fretless. My ears simply wanted the sound of a fretless, at times. With the wonders of the internet at my disposal, I dove into the web pretty hard to learn and research. I figured out what sound I really wanted within the world of fretless. I also figured out what characteristics of the instrument were important for me, personally, aside from those specifically relegated to giving me the tone color I wanted. And with further research, a few I learned about were linked to tone. My beloved LB70PF is the result. What a gem.
B. Lined or unlined fingerboard? Mario Sangermano, a pro player who is on the K/C BBS at times (see my appreciation thread in the Pro Players area) spent time in PM land with me. Patient, kind, and helpful. He nudged me to go for no lines on the fingerboard, and taught me the reasons for that from the perspective of developing as a player over time. I took his advice and am glad I did. But this is a very personal choice.
C. The most helpful initial advice I ever saw on fretless was to get the fretless version of your current (fretted) bass. This way the muscle memory transfers. Hooray. No-brainer YES on that advice!
D. One reason I wanted a fretless, other than tone, was to develop as a bassist. I knew it would be another world, and not easy. I wanted to grow in that way. Glad I did.
E. Eventually, I wanted a different tone for a fretless, knew what I was after, and got a second. I have that one in the "Other Gear" area of the BBS. It has the beloved K/C split pu. What a gem.
F. Lastly, and some might disagree, but I'll say this -- there's no sound from a fretted I can't get on a fretless. Now mind you, I'm talking about my dual single coil walnut K/C fretless with the epoxy coated board. That thing rips like a buzz saw if I want it to. I can mute my way into a P-sounding vibe using only my hands (no foam mute). I can rock it out all day right down the middle. In short, I can play a whole set on that thing and never switch out. My point is that many relegate fretless to a certain fuzzy or woody organic tone, or mwah. They are wrong. But with a fretless you ADD those capabilities and don't lose any of what an electric bass can do.

Ok, last topic. Going to a 5 or 6? I have never played a 5 or a 6.
A. Don't stop playing 4. Add a 5 or 6. They are different.
B. If I had ever played guitar, I would get a 6, not a 5. Why? Chords, double stops, scale expansion for runs, and jazz elements.
C. The "reason" to get a 5 or 6 is the Eb. I'm sort of joking, but our group does a lot in Bb and in Eb. Those are related, of course. I can't get an Eb below that darn 6th fret on the A string. But on a 5 it exists. The more musical reason to get a 5 is related to this Eb issue. As your bass playing expands, if you play anything of an improvisational nature, or can write your own lines, you will notice one thing. You will notice that parts you develop often start with a fundamental and your thinking will naturally be to add a tone above that "1", like a 3 or 4, a 5 or an 8. You can spend years getting to be quite excellent at that. Later, a more developed/well-rounded player shows up at your practice and sits in for one song. That player starts a line BELOW the fundamental, and moves UP TO the "1", starting on the 5th BELOW the 1, then hitting the 6, 7, and lastly resolving on the 1 (in time, where the scale tone "1" fundamental occurs on the "1" of the four count beat), and your mind is blown. "I've been playing my whole life moving only UP from the 1. Why haven't I ever dug out the basement, started BELOW the 1, and moved up to it? CRAP!" With a 5, you are in a funk-feel heaven of low-tones below the 1.
D. I've never gotten a 5, because I am determined to get it done on 4. I am stupid, old-fashioned, stubborn and lazy. I would get a cello before I got a 5. If cello was tuned in fourths like bass, I would already have one. You do what works for you, and forget what is "right" or "wrong" according to others.
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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby gumbynotpokey » Sat Jun 03, 2017 7:31 am

On an unrelated note (pun intended), imagine an improvisational approach in a trio of piano, bass, and drums - where the piano player almost NEVER plays the root note of any chord on the left hand. Imagine a piano player so skilled in what to NOT to do, defying all their instincts in piano training, that they can do this mechanically without thinking. They play all the chords with the left hand as-written, but leave out the fundamental. E natural? Sure, but it's "E natural, E-delete". Who gets to play that "E"? The bassist. So you get a hugely open space of melody and of harmony possibilities.

Now make those two some of the most technically advanced in terms of pure theory as well as performance, who know how to fill those spaces in the sickest possible ways, and you have this result....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rARGPAkIcw4
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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby brento73 » Sat Jun 03, 2017 7:52 am

Great stuff, GnP, as usual :)

Right now I have this used Yamaha I just picked up(4 string, 24 frets, sounds and plays pretty well), so I don't imagine getting a fretless version of the exact same thing. An Aries or Vanquish fretless would be the most similar(34", 24 'fret', 4-string).

I have to say I didn't really care for the Vanquish when I first saw them, but they're growing on me, and the upper frets look like an easier reach than on the Aries. :think:

The funny thing is, I'm a guitar player. I'm wanting to learn to be a proper bass player(not just a guitarist who plays it like a big guitar... you get the idea), and yet.... I have trouble figuring out why I would ever need a second guitar, since my Fatboy is so awesome, but I'm sitting here queuing up like... at least three basses I need to save up for! :lol:

4-string fretted(this used bass was a great deal, but it's not a Kiesel/Carvin)
4-string fretless
6-string fretted(maybe a Vader, since I could save some weight there)

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby gumbynotpokey » Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:43 am

brento73 wrote:...at least three basses I need to save up for! :lol:

4-string fretted(this used bass was a great deal, but it's not a Kiesel/Carvin)
4-string fretless
6-string fretted(maybe a Vader, since I could save some weight there)


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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby gumbynotpokey » Sat Jun 03, 2017 10:17 am

Ok, here's a clip (repeats itself, oddly, not sure why) with Bootsy explaining the downbeat of the 1 as an element of funk.

He also shows an example, at about 1:40 or 50 or so, of moving below the fundamental of the chord (the 1, not in beats, but in terms of chord tones) and back up to it (rather than always/only building lines ABOVE the fundamental).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uym6jjHA9hY
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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby brento73 » Sat Jun 03, 2017 10:25 am

Very cool stuff! 8)

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby lucien » Sat Jun 03, 2017 10:55 am

My .02 on lines and another thought on 5+ strings.

My preference is no lines. At some point, playing FL stops being about just landing in the right place and more about intonating all the time, on every note. For me, lines pretty much only help me land in the right place, but they don't help or hurt adjusting the note itself. So I played lines for a while but eventually didn't really find them useful anymore for me. I still have to intonate on every note regardless. And that's completely an ear/hand coordination thing, not visual.
But Bunny Brunel for example plays lined and says it helps him, so... Hard to say which to go with.

Also, if you get a lined bass, make sure you get a hard finish over the board - the HAN option. No matter how well done the inserts are in the fingerboard, wood is still an organic material. So the wood does eventually move around and change shape etc. Crevices will eventually start to form around the slots and even microscopic ones will result in nasty annoying buzzing. In very long term cases, the inserts can start coming out. A complete redo of the board is necessary when that happens. So a hard finish will prevent that. Even Carvins aren't immune to this, no bass is unless it's made out of plastic or something like that. This is just the nature of the beast of anything made out of wood.

The only other consideration for 5 or 6 strings is you'll need a good muting technique. You can get by without one on a 4, but on a 5 and especially a 6, you will go absolutely nuts without a good method of muting the lower strings when playing on the high ones. I learned the so called "floating thumb" when I was playing 6 string full time some years ago and I still use it on my 5's and 4s. So just something to keep in mind if you do go with a 5 or 6.

LS

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Re: Bass contemplations

Postby gumbynotpokey » Sun Jun 11, 2017 7:05 pm

Speaking of bass contemplations, whatchuall think of this? It would be bevel delete, by the way.

Base Model Options Quantity Price
AB4
Right Handed
1 $1,049.00
­MA ­ Maple Neck/Alder Body (Standard) $0.00
­CG ­ Clear Gloss Finish (Standard) $0.00
GM ­ Gunmetal Gray Metallic $100.00
­TN ­ Tung Oil Finish Back Of Neck (Standard) $0.00
­XH ­ Xccelerator Bass Headstock (Standard) $0.00
REPH ­ Royal Ebony Headstock Matches Body Finish $70.00
REF ­ Royal Ebony Fingerboard $60.00
ID ­ Dot Inlays $0.00
IA ­ Abalone Inlay Material $50.00
STF ­ Stainless Med­Jumbo Frets .048" H .103" W $40.00
­R14 ­ 14in Fretboard Radius (Standard) $0.00
­BLK ­ Black Pickups $0.00
SCPN ­ Replace Neck Pickup With SCP Split­Coil Pickup $40.00
­CHR ­ Chrome Hardware (Standard) $0.00
FWS ­ Flat Wound Med Light $20.00
ABL ­ Abalone Logo $30.00
TCE ­ Ebony Truss Rod Cover $35.00
SC8 ­ Black Ultimate Soft Bass Case $60.00
Custom Shop Total: $1,554.00
Options Discount: $­100.00
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Praiser
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Posts: 757
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Kansas Flatland

Re: Bass contemplations

Postby Praiser » Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:15 pm

gumbynotpokey wrote:Speaking of bass contemplations, whatchuall think of this? It would be bevel delete, by the way.

Base Model Options Quantity Price
AB4
Right Handed
1 $1,049.00
­MA ­ Maple Neck/Alder Body (Standard) $0.00
­CG ­ Clear Gloss Finish (Standard) $0.00
GM ­ Gunmetal Gray Metallic $100.00
­TN ­ Tung Oil Finish Back Of Neck (Standard) $0.00
­XH ­ Xccelerator Bass Headstock (Standard) $0.00
REPH ­ Royal Ebony Headstock Matches Body Finish $70.00
REF ­ Royal Ebony Fingerboard $60.00
ID ­ Dot Inlays $0.00
IA ­ Abalone Inlay Material $50.00
STF ­ Stainless Med­Jumbo Frets .048" H .103" W $40.00
­R14 ­ 14in Fretboard Radius (Standard) $0.00
­BLK ­ Black Pickups $0.00
SCPN ­ Replace Neck Pickup With SCP Split­Coil Pickup $40.00
­CHR ­ Chrome Hardware (Standard) $0.00
FWS ­ Flat Wound Med Light $20.00
ABL ­ Abalone Logo $30.00
TCE ­ Ebony Truss Rod Cover $35.00
SC8 ­ Black Ultimate Soft Bass Case $60.00
Custom Shop Total: $1,554.00
Options Discount: $­100.00


I for one think it sounds like a way cool build! Especially dig the fingerboard and headstock in Royal Ebony.
John

LB75AP, LB70P, X54F, BK50, BK50F, BK40, C780
PB100, PB200 (With BX500 head and 1x15 ext Cab)
XP1000L, LM153s, LS1801A
Rogue Fretless, Ibanez ABG, Dobro Bass
Peavey Fury P Bass

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MikeBass
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Posts: 2143
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: California

Re: Bass contemplations

Postby MikeBass » Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:25 pm

gumbynotpokey wrote:Speaking of bass contemplations, whatchuall think of this? It would be bevel delete, by the way.

Base Model Options Quantity Price
AB4
Right Handed
1 $1,049.00
­MA ­ Maple Neck/Alder Body (Standard) $0.00
­CG ­ Clear Gloss Finish (Standard) $0.00
GM ­ Gunmetal Gray Metallic $100.00
­TN ­ Tung Oil Finish Back Of Neck (Standard) $0.00
­XH ­ Xccelerator Bass Headstock (Standard) $0.00
REPH ­ Royal Ebony Headstock Matches Body Finish $70.00
REF ­ Royal Ebony Fingerboard $60.00
ID ­ Dot Inlays $0.00
IA ­ Abalone Inlay Material $50.00
STF ­ Stainless Med­Jumbo Frets .048" H .103" W $40.00
­R14 ­ 14in Fretboard Radius (Standard) $0.00
­BLK ­ Black Pickups $0.00
SCPN ­ Replace Neck Pickup With SCP Split­Coil Pickup $40.00
­CHR ­ Chrome Hardware (Standard) $0.00
FWS ­ Flat Wound Med Light $20.00
ABL ­ Abalone Logo $30.00
TCE ­ Ebony Truss Rod Cover $35.00
SC8 ­ Black Ultimate Soft Bass Case $60.00
Custom Shop Total: $1,554.00
Options Discount: $­100.00



Doo iitttt! :applause: :rockon:
The gunmetal grey would look outstanding with the royal ebony
Kiesel basses, lots of pedals, nothing wrong


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